The ‘French 75’ – A Classy Start to a Party

Last week was my best friend, Damien’s, birthday so to celebrate we threw a lockdown BBQ with the permitted amount of people from the permitted number of households. And as every celebration should, we kicked off with a cocktail.

Cocktails can be a faff – and truth be told they always taste better when made by someone else. I learnt to make the staples while working in a restaurant in Paris… I’m no mixologist, but I do make a mean martini.

The French 75 has always been a favourite of mine – it is simple, needs no cocktail kit and has a degree of flexibility. The ‘Savoy Cocktail Book’ and ‘The Art of Mixing Drinks’ both have recipes for French 75. One uses gin, one uses cognac, both are served in long glasses over ice and both use sugar.

French 75 recipes
Two recipes, one drink and no agreement

Like its country namesake, the French 75 has had a revolution… I’ve only ever used gin; I’ve never used sugar and have only served in either a flute or a coupe without ice. This is standard.

So, here’s how to make a classy cocktail without the fuss of a shaker… but don’t forget the golden rule of cocktails; they are like boobs or legs* – one isn’t enough, two is just right, and three is too many.

* Use the appropriate analogy for your audience.

Music to listen to while making the French 75: ‘C’est si bon’ by Eartha Kitt

Ingredients

  • 1 measure Gin (Gordons is fine, Pink Gin if you’re feeling fancy)
  • ½ measure Lemon juice
  • A slither of Lemon rind
  • Champagne

Method

  1. Pour the gin and lemon juice into a chilled Champagne flute or coupe and swirl to mix.
  2. Top up with champagne, add the lemon rind, serve.
  3. Don’t drink too many.

2 Comments

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.